Surrogacy confirmation and Prenatal Care

If your surrogate mother tests positive for pregnancy, your clinic should begin prenatal preparation immediately.

Pregnant-WomanIn Western countries where access to medical care is widespread, the surrogate most often returns home for the duration of the pregnancy. Prenatal care generally includes nutritional supplements, lifestyle changes (no-smoking or drinking), and routine visits to the clinic for examinations. Prenatal visits — often scheduled about every four weeks during the first trimester — will check the surrogate’s weight and blood pressure, discuss any possible warning signs or symptoms, and often include an ultrasound scan.

Overseas, where prenatal care is more affordable but less available, it is generally preferred for the surrogate to stay in an apartment under trained medical supervision. Most often the surrogate is allowed to stay with family members in an apartment provided by the clinic (which is included in the standard surrogacy fee). Prenatal housing is especially important for surrogates who otherwise live far away from the clinic or other hospital, and have limited transportation options.

A surrogacy clinic or agency that allows its surrogates to live hours away without access to a car or other transportation would be irresponsible in the event of a medical emergency (including premature labor, cramps or bleeding, or other common pregnancy symptoms that may indicate serious problems).

In the first trimester of the pregnancy, most overseas clinics will provide a medical examination every week, including blood tests and ultrasound scans. Scan results are sent to the Intended Parents, along with all lab results. In the second and third trimester, prenatal exams are less frequent, occurring monthly. Toward the end of the pregnancy the clinic will increase the frequency of visits again, as the doctor evaluates the final development of the fetus and make preparations for the delivery.

 
 

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